World Cassowary Day a huge success

Remember my posts on the Cassowary and World Cassowary Day? It was a success! Read on about it.

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worldcassowaryday3lrAbout 1000 cassowary devotees converged on the Daintree Rainforest Observatory to celebrate World Cassowary Day on Saturday 24 September. The Daintree rainforests provided a stunning backdrop to an exciting day.

Visitors and locals participated in wide range of activities for adults and children, browsed 40 colourful and informative stalls, and listened to a range of talks on cassowaries and their conservation, the Daintree Blockade and Wet Tropics insects.

The Threatened Species Commissioner, Gregory Andrews, outlined the Australian Government’s plans to help the recovery of the endangered southern cassowary and recognised the strong community support for cassowary conservation.

Cairns was declared as the region to host the 2017 World Cassowary Day.

All photos provided courtesy of Daintree Marketing Co-op.

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A fogbow is a very similar to a rainbow; however, as its name suggests, it appears as a bow in fog rather than rain.  It is also a rare phenomena too.  Small water droplets create a fogbow.  Very weak colors are seen in a fogbow.  It has a bluish inner edge and a reddish outer edge.

A sea dog fogbow over the south Oregon coast (Photo by JHL)
A sea dog fogbow over the south Oregon coast (Photo by JHL)

Since the water droplets are very small, the fogbow appears white, which is why it is sometimes white rainbows.  When the droplets forming it are almost all of the same size the fogbow can have multiple inner rings, or supernumeraries, that are more strongly colored than the main bow.  Unlike a rainbow, fogbows normally appear as a band of bright white, sometimes with hints of red or blue. Because of these differences, fog bows are often referred to by other names – cloud bows, white rainbows or ghost rainbows.

Mars & a Lunar Fog Bow
Mars & a Lunar Fog Bow Mars & a Lunar Fog Bow. Mars and a Colorful Lunar Fog Bow Credit & Copyright: Wally Pacholka (AstroPics.com, TWAN)

When viewing a fogbow from the air looking down, such as when you’re in an airplane, it is called a cloud bow.  Mariners sometimes called his phenomena sea dogs.  When a fogbow is seen at night, it is called a lunar fog bow.

The Mie scattering simulation used a mean droplet diameter of 60 micron with a lognormal distribution of diameters having a standard deviation 12% to match the width of the primary fogbow and the position of the two supernumerary arcs inside the main bow.

A fogbow has the same direction as a rainbow so that the sun would be behind the viewer and the direction would be into the bank of the fog.  Its outer radius is slightly less than that of a rainbow.

Fogbow in the Arctic
Fogbow in the Arctic

Your best chances of catching a fogbow are when the Sun is shining brightly and the fog is thin – they’ll appear as the sun breaks through the fog behind you. You’ll often find fogbows as the cool sea mists roll in over the ocean or as fog makes its way down a hillside or mountainside. And, if you happen to be in the middle of a fog or a cloud – say, in an airplane – you might see a full circle rather than an arch as seen below.

Full circle fogbow.
Full circle fogbow.

On rare occasions, you might see a solar glory or a Brocken spectre within a fog bow. Glories look just like halos, and they’re normally centered on a Brocken spectre or an object within the fog. These colorful rings are created by sunlight reflecting off water droplets in much the same way that rainbows and fogbows are created. A Brocken spectre is a spooky phenomenon that looks like a ghost within the fog. These shadowy shapes are named after a peak within Germany’s Hartz Mountains where Brocken spectres are commonly seen. Brocken spectres are caused by a shadow thrown on the fog – either your own, or that of a nearby object.

Brocken Spectre at Lough Corrib, a lake in the west of Ireland, near the city of Galway. Photo by Conor Ledwith Photography.
Brocken Spectre at Lough Corrib, a lake in the west of Ireland, near the city of Galway. Photo by Conor Ledwith Photography.

Till Next Time,

xo-heather

 

 

 

GiveThanks Challenge x7 2016

Yesterday, I joined KBR Ministries GiveThanks Challenge x7 2016.  This is my second year in a row doing this challenge.  It’s a great way to learn how to be thankful for 30 days in a row, humble thyself, and meet some very lovely and inspirational like-minded people.  I have posted the information below about the challenge.  My bff and I are doing it together and are accountability partners.  You may click the picture to take you to site to sign up if you’re interested.

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KBR Ministries’ 2016
GIVE THANKS!x7 CHALLENGE

With the Thanksgiving season approaching, let us challenge one another in giving thanks to the Father of all gifts every day this month. You are invited to join us for the next 30 days as we praise Him for His daily benefits!

You are welcome to ask a sibling or accountability partner to take this challenge with you!

Begins: November 1, 2016

Ends: November 30, 2016

Rules: Write down at least 7 things each day that you are grateful for!

You can either write your list each day in your own personal journal, or join us on our private online group, where members can write their daily lists throughout the month. It’s a blessing to lift up grateful hearts together!

If you miss a day, please make it up the next day.

Reward: Send us a letter by December 5, 2016, letting us know that you completed the 2016 GiveThanks! challenge. You can fill out this chart OR simply write a letter including your name, age, parent’s signature, and mailing address. On the envelope, please specify “GIVE THANKS CHALLENGE.” We will send you a surprise prize for completing the challenge!

(We’re sorry, email letters do not qualify for a prize. Letters postmarked after this date cannot be rewarded. )

 

I hope to see you guys there!

Till Next Time,

xo-heather

Here in western NY, we are in the thick of Autumn.  The leaves are in their peak.  This is what the southern tier, WNY is known for-the beautiful enchanted mountains.  Last night we got some rain and when I took Isabelle outside, I could smell the wet leaves.  Such a lovely smell.

These are some photos I took myself on our way up to take my baby sister back to school at SUNY Morrisville on 11 October 2016.  Photos are best viewed full-sized and can be done so by clicking the photos.

And these I took yesterday, 16 October 2016, while out riding around.  Once again , photos are best viewed full-sized and can be done so by clicking the photos.

I hope autumn is as beautiful in your neck of the woods as it is here🙂

That’s all I got for today.  I’ll catch y’all next time!

xo-heather

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When Autumn comes, it sometimes comes in a blink of an eye.  One day it is summer and then the next, you notice a subtle crispness in the air.  Then it is pumpkin-spice time, chunky knitted sweaters and knee-high boots are everywhere.  This is the work of the Autumn Equinox. It is also known as Michaelmas, Mabon, and Harvest Home.  It comes without any fanfare.  We pass it on the calendar in its small print in a blink of an eye.

This year, the Autumn Equinox happens approximately at 10:26am EDT on Thursday 22 September 2016.  The sun will rise at 6:44am and set at 6:52pm, giving us 8 minutes more of daylight over night.  The equinoxes happen at the same moment everywhere.  More light is called equilux(“lux” being Latin for light).

Autumnal Equinox Illustration
Autumnal Equinox Illustration

 

Depending on what side of the equator you live, you have different seasons than the opposite side.  The equinox in September in the north is known as the Autumnal(fall) equinox and the one in the south is known as the vernal(spring) equinox.  Each year has two equinoxes, September and March, when the sun shines directly on the equator and length of day and night are almost equal on both sides of the equator.  This equinox occurs the moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator-the imaginary line above the Earth’s equator-from North to South.  This can happen on either September 22, 23, or 24 every year.

Earth Orbits Sun At a Slant
Earth Orbits Sun At a Slant

The angle at which the Earth is tilted at is 23.4º, to the ecliptic, or the imaginary plane Earth’s path creates around the sun.

Both hemispheres are always tilt a little towards the sun on any other day of the year, but on these two days, the Earth’s axis is always perpendicular towards the sun, as illustrated in the picture above.

On the Equinox, the night and day are nearly the same-12 hours-all over the world.  Equinox is derived from the Latin word aequus,  eqi meaning “equal” and nox meaning “night”.  Despite this being commonly accepted definition, in reality, equinoxes don’t exactly have 12 hours of daylight.  If you want to read more about why they don’t have exactly 12 of day, please click HERE.

hello autumn!
hello autumn!

Until December, the days get shorter until the Winter solstice, when the light will make its slow creep back to long summer days.  Technically, Winter Solstice is the shortest day of the year, compared to the summer solstice in June, which has the longest sunlight.

Wikimedia Commons/CC BY 2.0
Wikimedia Commons/CC BY 2.0

Due to the fact that it takes Earth 365.25 days to orbit the Sun and why we have a leap year every year, the precise time of the equinox varies every year.  But usually it happens six hours later on each successive year.  On leap years though, the date jumps back an entire day.

Male Siberian Hamster
Male Siberian Hamster

Brilliant leaves and geomagnetic storms aren’t the only things that ramp up around the time of the autumnal equinox.  The creature world also does too.  Animals at high latitudes also go through biological changes with the changing of the seasons.  For example, the Siberian hamster, experiences the growth of their testes of up to 17 times their normal size in days leading up to when the days get shorter.

The Japanese traditionally mark both the Spring and Autumn Equinox with higan, higan-festivala seven-day period where they honor and remember their ancestors by visiting their graves by cleaning graves and offering flowers and foods, and burning incense sticks and praying.

 

 

 

Priest blessing food and flowers during the Polish Festival of Greenery.
Priest blessing food and flowers during the Polish Festival of Greenery.

In Poland, the Polish celebrate the Polish Festival of Greenery bring bouquets of flowers and foods to a priest for a blessing, and then using them for medicine or keeping them until the following year’s harvest.  The Roman celebration of the Fall Equinox was dedicated to Pomona, goddess of fruits and growing things

A well-fattened goose which had fed well on the stubble on the fields after the harvest is traditionally feasted on.  Ginger is also part of the tradition too.  Every single piece of food that is served that day at the feast is seasoned with ginger from gingerbread to ginger beer.

The last piece of corn that was harvested was made into a doll in England,corn-huskdolls representing the “spirit of the field”.  Drenched in water, this would represent rain or they were burned, representing the death of the spirit of the grain.  Large wickerwork figures are burned in a mock sacrifice or constructed to present a vegetarian spirit.  The large wickerwork figures also represented those two factors as well.  Farmers and merchants gathered at fairs.  Often there would be a large glove was suspended above the fair, symbolizing  the handshake of promises and open-handedness and generosity.

 

Burning Man Galen Oaks 2015
Burning Man Galen Oaks 2015

The “burning man” has seen a revival in the US.  It is celebrated at the end of summer.  It is an enthusiastic festival of performance arts and creativity.  Participating in your own burning man celebration is a powerful way to connect with humanity, past and present.

 

 

Autumn is a great time to still get out and do many activities before having to stay inside all winter.  This is just a small sampling of the many activities celebrated worldwide to usher in the annual Autumn Equinox.

How do you celebrate Autumn Equinox?  Do you look forward to autumn?  Please continue the conversation below.  If you liked this post, click “like” below and share to your favorite social networks.   I hope you enjoyed this post.  Thanks!

 

Till next time…

xo-heather